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Langauges in "Amauta"  

 

Laura Fólica
Joined: 5 months ago
Posts: 4
 

Many thanks, Hanno and Jörg, for your wonderful overview about Amauta!

I am wondering what happened with indigenous languages in Amauta. Do you know if there are translations into Spanish or texts published in Quichua or other indigenous languages? You talk about the importance of Mexico in Amauta, but what happened with Mexican indigenous languages? Does this linguistic topic really concern Amauta?

You claim that the pictorial level was important in order to build an Indo-American society that transcends national boundaries (a really interesting idea!). In that sense, is it possible to find a parallel with languages? What was the place for native languages in the transnational image of community proposed by Amauta?

Thanks for your answer!

Best wishes from Barcelona,

Laura

 


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Hanno Ehrlicher
Joined: 6 months ago
Posts: 4
 

Dear Laura,
thank you for your commentary and this question about the presence of indigenous languages in Amauta. Quechua is present in Amauta only as a „dead“ - language and this is a main point of divergence compared to contemporary magazines in Peru like „Boletín Titikaka“. The revaluation of indigenous langagues is considered negativ in an article by Abalardo Solís about „la cuestión del Quechua“ who consideres the native language only as „reliquia“ and is brutal about its future: „El quechua se muere sin remedio y en buena hora que así sea“. Although this is the position of an individual author and should not be treated as Mariátegui's own one, the language politics of the magazine is monolinguistic communication in Spanish only, with translations from some major european languages as French, English or Russian. 

The interest of Amauta in Mexico does not imply, therefore, an interest in native languages as Nahautl or Maya. The Indo-Americanism therefore is more a symbolic appropriation of indigenous cultural heritage than a real interest to support politically indigenous actors and their culture. There existed during the Mexican Revolution even magazines in Nahuatl - interestingly one is called also „30-30!" as the later group of avant-garde painters we treated in our presentation, but those products are absent in the focus privileged by Amauta.


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Laura Fólica
Joined: 5 months ago
Posts: 4
 

Dear Hanno,

Thanks for your answer! I am going to explore “30-30” magazine because I am interested in the use of native languages in avant-garde publications.

All the best (and I hope you and your family are doing well)!

Laura

 


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